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The Southern Territory has nearly 100,000 IAM members in 21 District Lodges and more than 200 Local Lodges. Fourteen states make up the territory; Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.
The South is the birthplace of the IAM. It was formed in a railroad pit in Atlanta, Georgia in 1888. The Southern Territory carries on the proud tradition of our founders, joining together to make life better for working families everywhere.

History of Local Lodge 639
Local Lodge 639 was granted a charter on May 5 1963 under the name of Gates LearJet
Aeronautical Lodge 639 where 36 members became chartered members and signed the first contract.

1965 Plant Chair President Negotiating Committee-L. J .Endress, B. L. Lyles, H. L. Rees,B. W. Ross, C. E. Train,

1967 Plant chair President — Negotiating Committee,- I. C. Hartman, J D Metz Jr., L. K. Nelson, E. D. Salts, C. E. Train,

1970 Plant Chair J D Metz Jr., President Negotiating Committee,- C. E. Train, I. C. Hartman, D. Denham,C. E. Smith, M. A. Lee,

1973 Plant Chair J D Metz Jr., President Negotiating Committee,-R. E. Dalton. D. M. Denham, I. C. Hartman, C. E. Smith, R. I. Smith,

1976 Plant Chair J. D. Metz Jr., President Negotiating Committee,- D. M. Denham, C. J. Hiebert, C. E. Smith, R. I. Smith,

1978 Plant Chair J. D. Metz Jr., President Negotiating Committee, Robert W. David, Carl G. Hooker, Clyde E. Smith, Rosemary I. Smith,

1981 Plant Chair, Robert E. David, President Negotiating Committee, David E. Denham, Rickey D. Jones,Clyde E. Smith, Rosemary I. Smith,CarlG.Hooker, CarlG.Hooker,
1981 Jack D. Metz Jr. Business Rep.
1984 Plant Chair Robert E. David, President Negotiating Committee, David E. Denham, Carl G Hooker, Rickey D. Jones, Clyde E. Smith, Rosemary I. Smith, President–
1984 Business Rep Jack D. Metz Jr.
1987 Plant Chair Robert E. David, President Negotiating Committee, David E. Denham, Carl G Hooker, Rickey D. Jones, Clyde E. Smith, Rosemary I. Smith,
1987 Business Rep Jack D. Metz Jr.
1990 Plant Chair Robert E. David, Negotiating Committee, David E. Denham, Carl G Hooker, Rickey D. Jones, Clyde E. Smith, Rosemary I. Smith, President–Jack D. Metz J
1993 – Plant Chair Douglas D. David, President Robert E. David Negotiating Committee, Jack D. Metz Jr. Cornelia E Flory, Linda L. Moreland Roy L. Ekstein
1993 Business Rep. Mark Koester
1996 Plant Chair James Michael Steel President Sam Fulco Negotiating Committee

2000 Plant Chair Terry Haskins President Sam Fulco Negotiating Committee Pat Holiday Davld Strum Ken Lewellen Chester Armstrong Terry Kyle
Business Rep. James Michael Steele
2003 Plant Chair Terry Haskins President Sam Fulco Negotiating Committee Chester Armstrong Charles H. Chesnut Kenny Head Pat Holiday Kenny Lewellen
Business Rep. James Michael Steele
2006 Plant Chair Pat Holiday President Tony Spicer Negotiating committee
Greg Harper Kenneth F. Head Ken Lewellen James M. Steele,Rick Wyly
Business Rep. Terry Carrington
Special Rep. Mark Love
2009 Plant Chair Tony Spicer President Terry Haskins
Negotiating Committee Greg Harper Kenny Head Terry Haskins Ken Lewellen Rick Wyly
Business Rep. Steve Groom / Tony Lakin Special Rep. Mark Love
2012 Plant Chair Tony Spicer President Terry Kyle Negotiating Committee Terry Kyle Rick Wyly Kenny Lewellen Greg Harper Donna Clark
Business Rep Greg Treadwell International Rep Mark Love

History of the IAMAW
1888: 19 machinists meeting in locomotive pit at Atlanta, GA, vote to form a trade union. Machinists earn 20 to 25 cents an hour for 10-hour day.
1889: 34 locals represented at the first Machinists convention, held in Georgia State Senate Chamber, elect Tom Talbot as Grand Master Machinist. A monthly journal is started.
1890: First Canadian local chartered at Stratford, Ont. Union is named International Association of Machinists. Headquarters set up in Richmond, VA. Membership at 4,000.
1891: IAM Local 145 asks $3 for a 10-hour day.
1892: First railroad agreement signed with Atcheson, Topeka & Santa Fe.
1895: IAM joins American Federation of Labor (AFL), moves headquarters to Chicago.
1898: IAM Local 52, Pittsburgh, conducts first successful strike for 9-hour day.
1899: Time-and-a-half for overtime has become prevalent. Headquarters moved to Washington, D.C.
1903: Specialists admitted to membership. Drive begins for 8-hour day.
1905: Apprentices admitted to membership. There are 769 locals. Railroad machinists earn 36 to 43 cents an hour for 9-hour day.
1908: Metal Trades Department established within AFL with IAM President James O’Connell as president.
1911: Women admitted to membership with equal rights.
1912: Railway Employees Department established in AFL with Machinist A. O. Wharton as President.
1914: Congress passes Clayton Act limiting use of injunctions in labor disputes and making picketing legal.
1915: IAM wins 8-hour in many shops and factories. IAM affiliates with International Metalworkers Federation.
1916: Auto mechanics admitted to membership.
1918: IAM membership reaches 331,000.
1920: Headquarters moved to first Machinists Building, at 9th & Mt.Vernon Pl., N.W., Washington, D.C. British Amalgamated Engineering Union cedes its North American locals to IAM.
1920: Machinists earn 72 to 90 cents an hour for 44-hour week.
1922: 79,000 railroad machinists pin shopmen’s strike against second post-war wage cut. Membership declines to 148,000.
1924: IAM convention endorses Robert M. LaFollette, Sr., for President.
1926: Congress passes Railway Labor Act requiring carriers to bargain and forbidding discrimination against union members.
1927: IAM urges ratification of Child Labor Amendments to U.S. Constitution; 2,500,000 children under 16 are working at substandard wages.
1928: 250 delegates at 18th IAM convention urge 5-day week to alleviate unemployment.
1929: Depression layoffs cut IAM membership to 70,000.
1932: Congress passes Norris LaGuardia Act banning use of court injunctions in labor disputes.Wisconsin adopts first unemployment insurance act. Nearly 30% of union members are jobless.
1933: IAM backs National Recovery drive and 40-hour week. FOR picks IAM Vice President Robert Fechner to head new Civilian Conservative Corps. Membership sinks to 56,000.
1934: IAM establishes Research Department.
1935: Congress adopts National Labor Relations Act establishing right to organize and requiring employers to bargain in good faith. IAM opens drive to organize aircraft Industry.
1936: First industrial union agreement signed with Boeing, Seattle. IAM convention endorses FDR for President. Membership climbs to 130,000.
1937: Social Security and Railroad Retirement Acts now in operation. IAM negotiates paid vacations in 26% of its agreements.
1939: IAM signs first union agreement in air transport industry with Eastern.
1940: Machinists rates average 80 cents an hour. IAM pledges full support to National Defense program. IAM membership climbs to 188,000.
1941: IAM pledges hail support to win the war including no-strike pledge.
1944: 76,000 IAM members serve in armed forces. Total membership now 776,000.
1945: First agreement with Remington Rand. IAM convention votes to establish weekly newspaper, education department. Widespread layoffs follow end of World War II.
1946: 88% of IAM agreements now provide for paid vacations.
1947: Congress enacts anti-union Taft-Hartley Act. Machinists Non-Partisan Political League founded. IAM Legal Department established. Machinists average $1.56 an hour.
1948: IAM membership opened to all regardless of race or color.IAM convention endorses Harry Truman for President.
1949: Railroad machinists win 40 hour week. Membership down to 501,000.
1950: IAM joins International Transport Workers Federation. Machinists now average $1.82 an hour.
1951: IAM pledges full support of UN action in Korea.
1952: Employees on 85% of airlines now protected by IAM agreements. 92% of IAM contracts provide for paid holidays.
1953: IAM has contracts fixing wages and working conditions with 13,500 employers. IAM Atomic Energy Conference organized.
1955: AFL and Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) merge, Machinist Al Hayes elected Vice President and chairman of Ethical Practices Committee. 70% of IAM contracts now have health and welfare provisions. Machinists average $2.33 an hour.
1956: 2,000th active local chartered. New ten story Machinists Building dedicated at 1300 Connecticut Ave., Washington, DC.
1958: IAM convention establishes a strike fund which was approved by the membership in a referendum vote. IAM membership now tops 903,000.
1959: Congress enacts anti-union Landrum-Griffin Act.
1960: IAM convention endorses JFK for President after personal visits from both Kennedy and Richard Nixon. IAM convention establishes college scholarship program. IAM establishes Labor Management Pension Fund.
1962: IAM Electronics Conference established. JFK issues Executive Order giving Federal employees a limited right to collective bargaining. Machinists now average $3.10 an hour.
1964: IAM convention endorses LBJ for President, after a personal appearance. Delegates vote to change name to International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers. Membership at 800,000.
1966: IAM members strike five major airlines and finally break through unfair 3.2% limit on wage increases. First dental care plan negotiated with Aerojet General.
1967: Railroad machinists lead shopcrafts against nation’s railroads. Congress forces return to work and arbitration.
1968: IAM membership tops 1,000,000. Machinists average S3.44 an hour.
1969: IAM member, Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin, the first space mechanic walks on the moon.
1970: Congress votes first Federal Occupational Safety and Health law. IAM is one of 19 unions in first successful coordinated bargaining effort against GE.
1971: IAM wins biggest back pay award in history, more than $54,500,00 for 1,000 members locked out illegally by National Airlines. IAM establishes Job Safety & Health Department.
1972: IAM membership drops to 902,000 as a result of recession and layoffs in defense industries. IAM President Floyd Smith quits U.S. Pay Board to protest unfair economic policies. IAM convention endorses Sen. George McGovern for President.
1973: IAM and UAW hold first joint Legislative Conference with 1,000 delegates in attendance. Machinists average $4.71 an hour. Membership rises to 927,000.
1974: Watergate scandal cast its shadow over labor unions along with the rest of the country. When President Nixon resigned, IAM wired President Gerald Ford, “You can count on our support and cooperation in your efforts to bring America back to the principles upon which it was founded.”
1976: IAM convention endorses Jimmy Carter for U.S. President., Delegates vote to set up Civil Rights and Organizing departments and expand community services program.
1977: William W. Winpisinger sworn in as the lAM’s 11th president.
1979: Citizen/Labor Energy Coalition launches first Stop Big Oil day to protest obscene profits by oil conglomerates while American workers’ paychecks continue to shrink.
1980: IAM media project begins. Thousands of IAM members and their families monitor prime time TV to determine media’s portrayal of working people and unions.
1981: Older Workers and Retired Members Department is established at Grand Lodge.
1982: Reaganomics grips nation. Individual and corporate bankruptcies reach epidemic proportions. IAM membership begins drop to 820,211.
1983: IAM introduces ‘Rebuilding America’ act to Congress as alternative to Reaganomics and to rebuild nation’s industrial base.
1984: IAM convention in Seattle WA, endorses Walter Mondale for U.S. President. Delegates vote funding for Placid Harbor Education Center to improve the level of understanding of workers in an ever changing world.
1987: IAM Executive Council establishes new Organizing Department, the first ever to be headed by a Vice President. First IAM Communications Conference convened in Kansas City, MO.
1988: IAM celebrates 100th anniversary in Atlanta, GA, on May 5.
1989: George J. Kourpias sworn in as the IAM’s 12th president.
1992: IAM moves to new state-of-the-art headquarters building in Upper Marlboro, MD, to keep pace with technological changes and serve members’ needs well into 21st Century; IAM convenes 33rd convention at Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
1994: International Woodworkers of America ratify merger agreement. More than 20,000 members join IAM family. Some 8,000 USAir fleet service workers say “IAM yes.” Machinist newspaper bids fond farewell, reborn as IAM Journal magazine.
1995: IAM, Auto and Steelworker unions debate plans for unification by year 2000. Unity plan sparks solidarity. Plan would create largest, most diverse union in North America, with more than 2,000,000 active members, 1, 400, 000 retirees. Sixty-nine day strike brings major victory in new contract at Boeing. Members air their views during first round of Town Hall meetings.
1996: ‘Fighting Machinists’ spearhead political battle for worker rights. Union efforts provide winning edge in Clinton-Gore presidential victory. Meeting in Chicago, IAM Convention delegates build bridge to 21st century. Delegates establish IAM Women’s Department.
1997: On July 1, Robert Thomas Buffenbarger, 46, takes office as 13th International president in 109-year IAM history, moves quickly to reshape Union to reflect growing diversity, interests, concerns of IAM members. Former IAM President Winpisinger dies Dec. 11.
1998: New Blue Ribbon Commission empaneled to provide membership forum to voice opinions. Placid Harbor facility renamed Winpisinger Education and Technology Center to honor visionary union leader, who brought the facility into being.
1999 General Vice President William Scheri retires, Robert Roach, Jr. takes over the Transportation Department. IAM Shares mutual fund created; llows members to put money to work in a fund that invests in IAM-represented companies. The National Federation of Federal Employees affiliates with the IAM. Unification effort with the Steelworkers and UAW ends because of major philosophical differences; the three unions vow to work together, however.
2000 The IAM endorses Al Gore for President. The AFL-CIO launches its New Alliance campaign, Grand Lodge Convention delegates respond with mandate that all IAM local and district lodges affiliate with their state AFL-CIO labor councils.The IAM meets in San Francisco for the 35th Grand Lodge Convention. The delegates establish Communicator and Educator positions.
2001 IAM Communications revamped with relaunch of website, online streaming of video, and repositioning of the IAM Journal as an advocacy magazine. IAM Executive Council reelected. William W. Winpisinger Education & Technology Center increases capacity by 50%. IAM Dedicates memorial to fallen members. IAM members perish in September 11 attack. The IAM volunteers to help in war against terrorism and to help America rebuild.
2002 The IAM establishes the Automotive Department and sets in place dozens of organizing blitzes. LL 2710’s Gary Blanke wins the IAM’s first photography contest. Members speak out at the 2002 Blue Ribbon Commission town hall meetings. Everyday Heroes, an IAM documentary, which tells the story of the workers who risked their lives in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, goes on sale. The proceeds go to treat rescue and recovery workers at Ground Zero. The Transportation Department ignites a nationwide Day of Action to urge passengers back onto trains and airplanes. IAM members join with other U.S. union members for the biggest midterm election turnout ever.
2003 The IAM creates the Department of Employment Services to help members cope with the worst recession in years; Tony Chapman named its director. IAM leaders meet in Cincinnati, Ohio. IP Buffenbarger vows “No more business as usual.” Presidential candidates Howard Dean and Richard Gephardt address the IAM leaders; Gephardt endorsed for president. GVP George Hooper passes away. Robert Martinez named Southern Territory GVP. ST Don Wharton Retires, Eastern Territory GVP Warren Mart succeeds Wharton. Lynn Tucker takes over as the Eastern GVP. James Brown takes over the Midwest Territory with the retirement of Alex Bay.
2004: The IAM Executive Council marches with thousands of trade unionists in Miami to protest Free Trade Area of the Americas. President George W, Bush’s “Wall of Shame” tours Iowa during that state’s presidential caucuses to bring job losses onto the national radar screen. CyberLodge, the innovative, open-source initiative to organize information technology workers opens for business. Former IAM President William W. Winpisinger is inducted into the International Labor Hall of Fame. The 36th Grand Lodge Convention convenes in Cincinnati and salutes North America’s Might. Vice presidential candidate Senator John Edwards from North Carolina appears at a convention rally after a unanimous endorsement of Senator John Kerry and Senator Edwards by the delegates.

RSS iMail – IAMAW

  • Martin Appointed Southern Territory Special Representative July 12, 2018
    IAM International President Bob Martinez has announced the appointment of Craig Martin to serve as Southern Territory Special Representative effective August 1, 2018. “As Directing Business Representative of District 161 for the past decade, he’s made it clear to all, that the labor movement isn’t a job for Craig,” said Southern Territory General Vice President […]
  • IAM Families Awarded 2018 Union Plus Scholarships July 12, 2018
    The Union Plus Scholarship Program announced its 2018 winners totaling $150,000 in scholarships. The list includes members of two IAM families who were recognized for their academic achievement and exhibition of union values. Betta Lyon-Delsordo of Missoula, MT, daughter of  NFFE-IAM Local 60 member David Delsordo, has been awarded a $4,000 scholarship. Julia Pelletier of […]
  • A Troubling Pick for the Supreme Court July 10, 2018
    The White House, with its nomination of D.C. Circuit Court Judge Brett Kavanaugh to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy on the U.S. Supreme Court, has chosen a man with a history of ruling against working people and their unions. “In terms of the business community, corporate interests and money, he is their dream choice,” said IAM […]
  • Federal Worker Executive Orders: What Civil Servants Need to Know July 10, 2018
    Machinists Union (IAM) and NFFE Federal District 1 (NFFE-IAM) members at a growing number of federal agencies are reporting drastic changes to work rules and procedures. More changes can be expected as agencies seek to comply with President Trump’s executive orders (EO’s) concerning the federal workforce. Under the guise of “civil service reform,” each of […]
  • Here’s How the Machinists Celebrated Freedom July 10, 2018
    Before the 4th of July, we put out a call for IAM members to share photos of how they celebrate our nation’s independence.  Here are some of our favorites. Thanks to everyone who participated! Posted by William LePinske on Wednesday, July 4, 2018 Posted by Adam Beasley on Wednesday, July 4, 2018 #IAMerica Happy 4th of July […]
  • Taking Care of the Machinists at Boeing July 10, 2018
    In 1936, the IAMAW signed its first contract with Boeing in Seattle. Little did anyone know this relationship would last for nearly a century. “The Machinists Union and Boeing have become synonymous with a defining product that has changed the industry across the U.S. We are proud of that relationship and the work our members at […]
  • Corpus Christ, TX Local Prepares for DynCorp Negotiations July 10, 2018
    Negotiating Committee for IAM Local 2916 from Corpus Christi, TX, along with staff members from District 776, participated in the Negotiation Preparation for Bargaining Committee’s program at the William W. Winpisinger Center in Hollywood, MD. The Locals represent employees at DynCorp International, which perform aircraft maintenance. The current contract with DynCorp International expires September 30, […]
  • Show Us How You Celebrate Freedom July 3, 2018
    We know how hard Machinists go on the 4th of July. BBQ and fireworks? Check. Water balloon fights and parades? Of course. So let’s see it! Post your July 4th selfies in the comments of our Facebook post or on Twitter using the hashtag #IAMerica. We will be sure to share the best posts. The […]
  • Machinists at Setco Agree to Another Three July 3, 2018
    If your office is a “Big Rig” or a heavy duty truck, then you know you are going to need a clutch that goes the distance. That’s where the IAM comes in. Machinist members from IAM Local Lodge 1387 who work at Setco Automotive (N.A.) Inc. in Paris, TN inspect and if needed, rework some of […]
  • IAM Honors Aviation High School Graduates July 2, 2018
    Aviation High School recently held its annual graduation ceremony. Approximately 440 students received their high school diploma, with many earning their Airframe and Powerplant licenses certifying them to work as mechanics in the airline industry.    This year, both the Valedictorian and Salutatorian were presented with IAM scholarships. There were several other airline representatives and sponsors that […]
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